Noise Engineering

Get out of the box -- and back in

Noise Engineering is a Eurorack and 5U modular synthesizer manufacturer based in Los Angeles, California. 

Did somebody say NEW DISTORTION? Introducing Seca Ruina

Have you been looking for a new way to distort your things, but Terci Ruina, Kith Ruina, and Viol Ruina weren’t enough for you? Look no further! Want CV-controlled multiband drive? So do we! Want an individual output for each frequency band, post-distortion? Yes! Also want a sum output with a bypassable VCA on top of all that? Sure you do! Want shiny LEDs? Of course! You’re in luck, because Seca Ruina has all of those things, and in just 6 HP! Let’s take a look at the features.

The Bands

When you plug your audio into the Seca Ruina, it gets split up into three bands: low, mid, and high. It’s kind of like a traditional 3-band EQ in structure. The band cuttoffs are set at 100hz and 1khz so you have nice musical control of a sound’s timbre. (A note on how that works: think about the three bands like a lowpass, bandpass, and highpass filter. The lowpass filter lets through everything below 100hz, the band pass lets through everything between 100hz and 1khz, and the highpass lets through everything above 1khz.) There’s a knob for volume/drive of each band, as well as a CV control for each, too. On top of that, there’s a universal CV input that controls all 3 bands at once. Each band has its own output, so you can take those and process them individually for some crazy effects. Here, we’ve taken a Basimilus Iteritas Alter, split it up into the three separate bands, and run those bands through Terci Ruina and Viol Ruina for even more distorted ridiculousness.

The Sum is greater than its parts

Of course each band is fed into a Sum output post-distortion, so if a single output will suffice, there it is. But SR has a trick up its sleeve: there’s a CV input on the Sum, too. It works a bit differently: when it’s unpatched, nothing happens. Patch a cable (ideally one sending, say, envelopes) to the CV input, though, and it activates a VCA on the output, so you can use the SR to control the volume of a voice, for instance. 

What do I do with this thing?

DISTORT STUFF. IN A VARIETY OF BANDS. 

Seriously, though, you can really use it for a whole lot of things. Since it can kind of act like a really aggressive EQ, you can use it to shape a sound and fit it into a patch, or with the CV ins, change the frequency layout of a sound with modulation a CV sequencer. With multiple CV ins, you can get incredible texture out of even a simple sound. I’ve run three envelopes from Pons Asinorum into the different level controls on SR to create this patch.

On the distortion side of things, often you’ll only want one part of a sound distorted. Already got a lot of high end? No problem, just drive the lows. 

Combined with an oscillator like Loquelic Iteritas and an envelope like Pons Asinorum, you have a complete synth voice with analog processing and loads of modulation and sound-shaping possibilities in a very small package. Why use a traditional VCA when you could use a MULTIBAND DISTORTION VCA??? Check out how cool that sounds in this patch. I’ve run LI into SR and added some percussion from Cursus Iteritas Percido and Basimilus Iteritas Alter. Fun stuff!

I want one I want one I want one

Go get your SR today! It’s shipping now, so ask your dealer or order direct from our webshop. Still not sold? Check out this in-depth video from POB all about the features on SR:




Noise Engineering is proudly located in Los Angeles, CA